You can use your smart phone to browse stories in the comfort of your hand. Simply browse this site on your smart phone.

    Using an RSS Reader you can access most recent stories and other feeds posted on this network.

    SNetwork Recent Stories

SCO Marks One-Year Anniversary by Launching MMIWG Public Awareness Campaign

by ahnationtalk on June 3, 202064 Views

June 3, 2020

ANISHINAABE AND DAKOTA TERRITORY, MB — On the one-year anniversary of the historic National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Women and Girls, and the release of the final report and Calls for Justice, the Southern Chiefs’ Organization is launching a public awareness campaign. The campaign, featured on billboards, bus boards, and social media, features the work of 18-year-old Winnipeg artist Ida Bruyere. Her painting, Lost But Not Forgotten, gives voice to the tragedy of missing and murdered women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA people and calls for a new future.

A proud citizen of Black River First Nation with family ties to Sagkeeng First Nation, Bruyere has been drawing since she was two years old. Among her many accomplishments, she created murals at St John’s and Gordon Bell high schools and assisted with an art project for CBC News in December of 2019.

“Not only is Ida Bruyere a gifted artist, she is an inspiring example of youth leadership in action,” said SCO Grand Chief Jerry Daniels. He congratulated Bruyere on her winning entry, noting she is a powerful role model as an artist, student, and mother.

Bruyere is involved in reconciliation and said, “I created Lost But Not Forgotten to give voice to the national crisis that is affecting Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA people throughout Canada.” She added, “I’m tired of seeing missing girls every time I go onto social media, of seeing devastated families crying over their loved ones and of wondering if I might be next. I remember reading a news article about a girl killed between the comfort of her home and a skating rink where she was supposed to meet a friend. We need to stop always feeling like a target.”

“Our goal is to end the violence by raising awareness of the systems and structures that put Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA people so disproportionately at risk,” said Grand Chief Daniels. “The powerful image Ida created honours the lives and legacy of missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA people, and the campaign invites all Manitobans and all Canadians to come together and join us.”

Grand Chief Daniels expressed his gratitude to all of the artists who submitted their work in response to a call for artistic expressions earlier this year. He also thanked the Advisory Committee of family members, survivors, and advocates for their time reviewing the many entries.

Bruyere also expressed her thanks, and said, “As a mother to a young son, I want to be a part of creating a new Canada, where all Nations are honoured and respected and where Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA people are safe and protected.”

Lost But Not Forgotten will be shared on billboards, bus boards, and social media throughout Winnipeg and southern Manitoba in June and July. Bus boards will be seen on 30 Winnipeg Transit buses on routes throughout the city. The billboards are located in Brandon, Portage la Prairie, Dauphin, Minnedosa, Winkler, and in Winnipeg at:

  • Notre Dame Avenue and Edmonton Street
  • McPhillips Street and Pacific Avenue
  • Kenaston Boulevard and Lindenwood Drive (as of June 15, 2020)
  • Osborne Street and Gertrude Avenue, and (as of June 15, 2020)
  • Regent Avenue West and Peguis Street (as of June 15, 2020)

SCO is committed to ending the violence and each day until October 4, 2020, a special date to honour missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA people in Manitoba, SCO will be highlighting one of the Calls for Justice to remind governments and institutions of their responsibilities. SCO invites all organizations and allies to do the same.

For more information on what you can do to end the violence, and for helpful resources, go to: https://scoinc.mb.ca/programs/violence-prevention/.

The Southern Chiefs’ Organization represents 34 First Nations that came together in 1999 to protect, preserve, promote, and enhance First Nations peoples’ inherent rights, languages, customs, and traditions through the application and implementation of the spirit and intent of the Treaty-making process.

-30-

For Media Inquiries:

Vic Savino, Communications Officer
(204)-946-1869 | vic.savino@scoinc.mb.ca

NT5

Send To Friend Email Print Story

Comments are closed.

NationTalk Partners & Sponsors Learn More